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Old 12-07-2010, 03:29 PM   #1
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Default Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America

Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America

http://www.ccfa.org/

About the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation

The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America is a non-profit, volunteer-driven organization dedicated to finding the cure for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. It was founded in 1967 by Irwin M. and Suzanne Rosenthal, William D. and Shelby Modell, and Henry D. Janowitz, M.D.

Four decades ago, the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation created the field of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis research. Today, the Foundation funds cutting-edge studies at major medical institutions, nurtures investigators at the early stages of their careers, and finances underdeveloped areas of research. Educational workshops and symposia, together with our scientific journal, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, enable medical professionals to keep pace with this rapidly growing field. No wonder the National Institutes of Health has commended the Foundation for "uniting the research community and strengthening IBD research."
Main areas of this section include:
  • Our Mission
    To cure Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and to improve the quality of life of children and adults affected by these diseases. Read more.
  • Your Dollars at Work
    The Foundation consistently meets standards established by the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance as well as other charity watchdog organizations. Learn more about how we steward your dollars. Read more.
  • Our Members
    Currently the Foundation has over 50,000 members, served by our national headquarters, as well as a over 40 chapters nationwide. As the Foundation is not a government-supported agency, we rely on the support of members and donors to continue our work. Read more.
  • Our Sponsors
    Our dedicated corporate sponsors provide significant grants to the Foundation, which have made possible many of our research, support, and education programs. Read more.
  • Global Partners
    The Crohn's & Colitis Foundation maintains informal partnerships with a variety of Crohn's and colitis-related organizations around the world for the purposes of cooperation on research and information sharing. Read more.
Employment Opportunities at the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation

At the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation, we realize that our employees are our most important asset. Our HR team works as a partner with the entire foundation to make every effort that all of our employees' talents are being used to their fullest potential. We are committed to attracting, hiring, and retaining the best and the brightest staff, which will ensure that we reach our goals. Our employees are offered competitive salaries and benefits. View current employment opportunities.
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Old 12-07-2010, 03:33 PM   #2
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I have Ulcerative Colitis do to stress from working for Florida Schools HVAC Dept.

I've had to change my Job and diet of what I eat

You have to make changes or feel the pain

More info yo help you learn

http://www.crohnsandcolitisinfo.com/UC
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Old 12-04-2011, 07:28 AM   #3
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First-Ever Crohn's and Colitis Awareness Week:
December 1-7!




Thanks to CCFA's advocacy efforts, including the invaluable help of our advocates, the week of December 1-7 has been designated as the very first Crohn's and Colitis Awareness Week

http://online.ccfa.org/site/PageNavi...ocacyPage.html
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Old 12-04-2011, 07:40 AM   #4
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If your looking for info. Then check out the CCFA Forums where you can read about others on how they deal with the IBD issues.

http://www.ccfacommunity.org/Forums.aspx
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Old 10-15-2012, 04:40 PM   #5
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Ulcerative colitis is a serious disease that can cause damage to the intestinal lining even when you're not experiencing symptoms.

REMICADE® is the only biologic treatment approved in adults to heal damage to the intestinal lining caused by UC. REMICADE®, in a 1-year clinical trial, has been shown to reduce signs and symptoms, induce and maintain remission (periods of few or no symptoms), promote intestinal healing, and reduce or stop the need for steroids in adult patients with moderately to severely active UC who haven't responded well to other therapies. Individual results may vary.

REMICADE® is not right for everyone. Only your doctor can decide if REMICADE® is right for you. Ask your doctor about REMICADE®. REMICADE® is given as a 2-hour IV infusion by a healthcare professional.

What should I tell my doctor before I take REMICADE®?

You should let your doctor know if you have or ever had any of the following:

• Tuberculosis (TB) or have been near someone who has TB. Your doctor will check you for TB with a skin test. If you have latent (inactive) TB, you will begin TB treatment before you start REMICADE®.
• Lived in a region where certain fungal infections like histoplasmosis or coccidioidomycosis are common.
• Infections that keep coming back, have diabetes or an immune system problem.
• Any type of cancer or a risk factor for developing cancer, for example, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or had phototherapy for psoriasis.
• Heart failure or any heart condition. Many people with heart failure should not take REMICADE®.
• Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection or think you may be a carrier of HBV. Your doctor will test you for HBV.
• Nervous system disorders (like multiple sclerosis or Guillain-Barré syndrome).



Also tell your doctor about any medications you are taking, including vaccines or Kineret (anakinra), Orencia (abatacept) or Actemra (tocilizumab) and if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant or are nursing. Adults and children should not receive a live vaccine while taking REMICADE®. If you have a baby and you were using REMICADE® during your pregnancy, tell your baby’s doctor about your REMICADE® use before the baby receives any vaccine.

What should I watch for and talk to my doctor about before or while taking REMICADE®?
The following serious (sometimes fatal) side effects have been reported in people taking REMICADE®. You should tell your doctor right away if you have any of the signs listed below:



• Infections (like TB, blood infections, pneumonia)—fever, tiredness, cough, flu, or warm, red or painful skin or any open sores. REMICADE® can make you more likely to get an infection or make any infection that you have worse.
• Lymphoma, or any other cancers in adults and children.
• Heart failure—new or worsening symptoms, such as shortness of breath, swelling of your ankles or feet, or sudden weight gain.
• Reactivation of HBV—feeling unwell, poor appetite, tiredness, fever, skin rash and/or joint pain.
• Liver injury—jaundice (yellow skin and eyes), dark brown urine, right-sided abdominal pain, fever, or severe tiredness.
• Blood disorders—fever that doesn't go away, bruising, bleeding or severe paleness.
• Nervous system disorders—numbness, weakness, tingling, changes in your vision or seizures.
• Allergic reactions during or after the infusion—hives, difficulty breathing, chest pain, high or low blood pressure, swelling of face and hands, and fever or chills.
• Lupus-like syndrome—chest discomfort or pain that does not go away, shortness of breath, joint pain, rash on the cheeks or arms that gets worse in the sun. The more common side effects with REMICADE® are respiratory infections (that may include sinus infections and sore throat), headache, rash, coughing and stomach pain.
• Psoriasis—new or worsening psoriasis such as red scaly patches or raised bumps on the skin that are filled with pus.
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Old 05-18-2016, 05:35 PM   #6
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With me having UC and dealing with stress from loosing a father friend, 2 of my cats that I loved so much, Mom 81 with dementia with a 5 min window on memory and drinking to much coffee with cream.

I am now dealing with a Anal fissures that is cracks or tears in the anus and anal canal.

Yes it is very painful and has been very hard for me to concentrate on my music or work.

I thought it would heal but after 3 or 4 months of bleeding.
I went to see my doctor today. He giving me Medicine that is not cheap but if it heals me then I will pay anything.

I am lucky to have an amazing wife of 28 years.
We are going to keep a book/diary and write down my good & Bad eating feels.


Here is some info to help you.

To stay organized, keep a food diary. Use a small notebook to write down what you eat and drink and how it makes you feel, both good and bad. It takes time and patience, but it will help you track your condition and fine-tune your diet plan.

Remember the basics of healthy eating: a well-balanced diet is high in protein, whole grains, and fresh produce. It can include meat, fish, poultry, and dairy products (if you’re not lactose intolerant), breads and cereals, fruits and vegetables, and healthy fats like olive and canola oils.

You might not be able to eat everything in those groups, but get what you can. Note any prep tweaks that make it easier to eat some foods, like steaming veggies or switching to low-fat dairy.

Some people follow a low-residue diet or low-fiber diet every so often, getting about 10-15 grams of fiber a day. That can help you go to the bathroom less often.

Some items are common troublemakers for people with UC, including:

alcohol
caffeine
carbonated drinks
dairy products, if you’re lactose intolerant
dried beans, peas, and legumes
dried fruits
foods that have sulfur or sulfate
foods high in fiber
meat
nuts, crunchy nut butters
popcorn
products that have sorbitol (sugar-free gum and candies)
raw fruits and vegetables
refined sugar
seeds
spicy foods


Foods That May Fight UC

New research shows that certain nutrients may help fight the irritation and swelling in your gut caused by UC. Researchers have studied how linoleic acid, found in foods such as walnuts, olive oil, egg yolks, and coconut oil, affects people with the condition. Although everyone needs this "good" fat, there is some evidence it may play a role in inflammation if you get too much.

Other studies have found that an omega-3 fatty acid called EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) may fight inflammation. It blocks certain chemicals in your body called leukotrienes. Fish oil is a good source of EPA. In some tests, people benefited from very high doses of it. Many, though, didn’t like the fishy taste.

Some scientific trials also found that yogurt with "good” bacteria, called probiotics, relieved inflammation. Scientists are still studying how these germs may help people with UC and similar conditions.
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Old 05-19-2016, 07:57 PM   #7
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Here a link for the food to eat with UC

http://www.everydayhealth.com/hs/ulc...s-pictures/#01
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Old 09-09-2016, 06:25 PM   #8
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What are the Signs and Symptoms?

About half of all patients with ulcerative colitis experience mild symptoms. Be sure to consult your doctor if you experience any of the following symptoms:

bowel movements become looser and more urgent
persistent diarrhea accompanied by abdominal pain and blood in the stool
stool is generally bloody
crampy abdominal pain

People suffering from ulcerative colitis often experience loss of appetite and may lose weight as a result. A feeling of low energy and fatigue is also common. Among younger children, ulcerative colitis may delay growth and development.

The symptoms of ulcerative colitis do tend to come and go, with fairly long periods in between flare-ups in which patients may experience no distress at all. These periods of remission can span months or even years, although symptoms do eventually return. The unpredictable course of ulcerative colitis may make it difficult for physicians to evaluate whether a particular course of treatment has been effective or not.

What are the Causes of Ulcerative Colitis? Who is Affected?

Although considerable progress has been made in IBD research, investigators do not yet know what causes this disease. Studies indicate that the inflammation in IBD involves a complex interaction of factors: the genes the person has inherited, the immune system, and something in the environment. Foreign substances (antigens) in the environment may be the direct cause of the inflammation, or they may stimulate the body's defenses to produce an inflammation that continues without control. Researchers believe that once the IBD patient's immune system is "turned on," it does not know how to properly "turn off" at the right time. As a result, inflammation damages the intestine and causes the symptoms of IBD. That is why the main goal of medical therapy is to help patients regulate their immune system better.

Research sponsored by CCFA has led many scientists to believe that ulcerative colitis may be the result of an interaction of a virus or bacterial infection of the colon and your body’s natural immune system response. Normally, your immune system will cause temporary inflammation to combat an illness or infection, and then the inflammation will be reduced as you regain health. In people with ulcerative colitis, however, this inflammation can persist long after your immune system should have finished its job.

Ulcerative colitis may affect as many as 700,000 Americans. Men and Women are equally likely to be affected, and most people are diagnosed in their mid-30s. The disease can occur at any age and older men are more likely to be diagnosed than older women.

While ulcerative colitis tends to run in families, researchers have been unable to establish a clear pattern of inheritance. Studies show that up to 20 percent of people with ulcerative colitis will also have a close relative with the disease.

Ulcerative Colitis, has seen a sharp increase throughout much of Europe in recent decades with higher incidence levels documented in northern and western parts of the continent. The disease can be extremely debilitating for patients and there is no solitary cause, although it is thought to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors.
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Old 09-12-2016, 05:33 PM   #9
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New Webcast:
Colorectal Cancer -- Understanding Risk and Prevention

Date: Wednesday, September 28, 2016
Time: 8:00 PM EST | 7:00 PM CST | 6:00 PM MST | 5:00 PM PST

Join us as our experts discuss:
Risk factors for developing colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Procedures and latest technology that can help detect colorectal cancer.
Ways to reduce your risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Get your colorectal cancer questions answered during the live Q&A following the presentation.

Register here
https://event.on24.com/eventRegistra...epage=register

Did you know there are ways patients with inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis can help in the prevention of colorectal cancer? While you may not always think about the risks, it is important to know that colorectal cancer is highly treatable in the early stages, so early detection is crucial! Join us for this program as our experts discuss the risks for patients, procedures that can help detect colorectal cancer, and ways you can help reduce the risks.
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